Visiting & Post-doctoral Fellows’ Publications & Working Papers

Rui Gao

“Revolutionary Trauma and Representation of the War: the Case of China in Mao’s Era” in Narrating Trauma: On the Impact of Collective Suffering, edited by Ron Eyerman, Jeffrey Alexander & Elizabeth Breese. Forthcoming, Paradigm Publishers.

July 7, 2012

Dominik Bartmanski

“Successful Icons of Failed Time. Rethinking Postcommunist Nostalgia” 2011 Acta Sociologica.

July 7, 2012

“How To Become an Iconic Social Thinker: The Intellectual Pursuits of Malinowski and Foucault” forthcoming in The European Journal of Social Theory.

July 7, 2012

“Notes on the Meaning and International Reception of Jeffrey Alexander’s Work” in Jeffrey Alexander: Social Meaning: Studies in Cultural Sociology, published in Polish by Nomos Publishers.

July 7, 2012

“Introduction: Materiality and Meaning in Social Life: Toward an Iconic Turn in Cultural Sociology,” with Jeffrey Alexander in The Iconic Turn in Sociology, edited by Jeffrey Alexander, Bernhard Giesen & Dominik Bartmanski. Forthcoming, Palgrave-MacMillan.

July 7, 2012

“Iconspicuous Revolutions of 1989. Culture and Contingency in The Making of Political Icons” in The Iconic Turn in Sociology, edited by Jeffrey Alexander, Bernhard Giesen & Dominik Bartmanski. Forthcoming, Palgrave-MacMillan.

July 7, 2012

“The Worst Was the Silence: The Unfinished Drama of the Katyn Massacre,” with Ron Eyerman in Narrating Trauma: On the Impact of Collective Suffering, edited by Ron Eyerman, Jeffrey Alexander & Elizabeth Breese. Forthcoming, Paradigm Publishers.

July 7, 2012

Peter Meylakhs

“Dangerous Knowledge vs. Dangerous Ignorance: Risk Narratives on Sex Education in the Russian Press,”Health, Risk and Society, Forthcoming.

February 17, 2011

“Symbiotic Goals and the Prevention of Blood-Borne Viruses Among Injection Drug Users,” with Samuel R. Friedman Milagros Sandoval, Pedro Mateu-Gelabert and Don C. Des Jarlais. Substance Use & Misuse, 46:307-315, 2011.

February 17, 2011

Andrea Voyer

“Disciplined to Diversity: Learning the Language of Multiculturalism”, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Forthcoming.

February 10, 2011

Steve Sherwood

“American Pop Frankenstein? Andy Warhol, Iconic Experience and the Advent of the Pop Society,” October, 2007.

Pop as a cultural phenomenon remains largely underappreciated and undertheorized. This article draws upon the classical work of Emile Durkheim’s Elementary Forms of the Religious Life along with more contemporary theorists such as Jeffrey Alexander in attempting to acknowledge the creative dimension of American pop culture. Cultural critics on both the left and right, such as C. Wright Mills and Daniel Boorstin, saw the rise of the Pop Society as reflecting the trivialization of culture as well as the increasing “dumbing down” of the American public in favor of such things as the “cult of celebrity.” Rather than substance, its critics argued that the Pop Society was driven solely by the media and entertainment. While Andy Warhol has been largely viewed as an emblem of the “profane” aspects of American culture, I draw on recent work such as Elizabeth Currid’s The Warhol Economy to argue that the representation of Warhol, like the Pop Society, also has its “sacred” dimension. Pop and its icons can be both emancipatory and liberating and are a necessary dimension of any healthy civil society. Where critics see Warhol as a kind of Pop “Frankenstein,” a deeper appreciation of his work and Pop culture enables us to see him as the iconographer of the symbols that unite us.

October 2007