Faculty Fellows

Christopher Bail
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Christopher Bail is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar at the University of Michigan. He studies the cultural consequences of collective behavior and social policies using mixed-method techniques.

His research has been published by American Sociological Review, recognized by awards from the American Sociological Association, the Society for the Scientific Study of Religion, and the Society for Study of Social Problems, and supported by the National Science Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 2011.

Dr. Bail is currently completing a book about the evolution of public discourse about Islam since the September 11th attacks; an article about how secrecy shaped discourse about British Domestic Counter-Terrorism Policy; and a new study of how non-profit organizations reach new audiences on the Internet using millions of lines of data collected via a Facebook application.

Curriculum Vitae

Peter Beilharz 

La Trobe University

Peter Beilharz attended Croydon High School and Rusden College, and after a short experience teaching high school went to Monash University, where he completed a doctorate on Trotskyism in 1984. He taught at Monash, RMIT, and Melbourne before replacing Agnes Heller at La Trobe in 1988, where he progressed from lecturer through to personal chair in 1999. In 1980 he co-founded the international journal of social theory, Thesis Eleven. Since 2002 he has been director to the Thesis Eleven Centre for Critical Theory at La Trobe. In the course of his travels Peter has been a visitor at Manila, Amsterdam, Chapel Hill, Mexico City, Sao Paolo and Tokyo and a visiting fellow at RSSS, ANU. He was Professor of Australian tudies at Harvard 1999-2000, and William Dean Howells Fellow at Harvard Library, 2002. He is a Faculty Associate in the Sociology Department at Yale. Peter has written or edited twenty books, including Labour’s Utopias (1992), Postmodern Socialism (1994), Transforming Labor (1994), Imagining the Antipodes (1997) and Zygmunt Bauman – Dialectic of Modernity (2002) and eighty papers. He is working on two ARC research projects, one with Trevor Hogan on the intellectual biography of Jean Martin, founding mother of Australian sociology, and another on Australia and New Zealand entitled “The Pursuit of Harmony and Social Division in the Antipodes Across the Twentieth Century.” Under the latter project, his next book will be a study of Australia called “The Unhappy Country.”

Seyla Benhabib 

Yale University

Seyla Benhabib is the Eugene Meyer Professor of Political Science and Philosophy at Yale University and Director of its Program in Ethics, Politics and Economics. Professor Benhabib is the President of the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association in 2006-07. She is the author of Critique, Norm and Utopia: A Study of the Normative Foundations of Critical Theory (1986); Situating the Self: Gender, Community and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics (1992; winner of the National Educational Association’s best book of the year award); together with Judith Butler, Drucilla Cornell and Nancy Fraser, Feminism as Critique (1994); The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt (1996; reissued in 2002); The Claims of Culture. Equality and Diversity in the Global Era, (2002) and most recently, The Rights of Others. Aliens, Citizens and Residents (2004), which won the Ralph Bunche award of the American Political Science Association (2005) and the North American Society for Social Philosophy award (2004). A new book, Another Cosmopolitanism: Hospitality, Sovereignty and Democratic Iterations, with responses by Jeremy Waldron, Bonnie Honig and Will Kymlicka is forthcoming from Oxford University Press in 2006. Her work has been translated into German, Spanish, French, Italian, Turkish, Swedish, Russian, Serbo-Croatian, Hebrew, Japanese and Chinese. She has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Science since 1996 and has held the Gauss Lectures (Princeton, 1998); the Spinoza chair for distinguished visitors (Amsterdam, 2001); the John Seeley Memorial Lectures (Cambridge, 2002), the Tanner Lectures (Berkeley, 2004) and was the Catedra Ferrater Mora Distinguished Professor in Girona, Spain (Summer 2005). She received an Honorary degree from the Humanistic University in Utrecht in 2004.

Andy Bennett 

Griffith University

Andy Bennett is Professor in Cultural Sociology at Griffith University. Prior to his appointment at Griffith, he held posts at Brock University in Canada and at the Universities of Surrey, Kent, Glasgow, and Durham (where he also gained his PhD in 1997) in the UK. Prior to working on his PhD he spent two years in Frankfurt, Germany working as a music instructor with the Frankfurt Rockmobil project. Andy specializes in the areas of youth culture and popular music. He has published articles in a number of journals, including The British Journal of Sociology, Sociology, Sociological Review, Media Culture and Society, Popular Music, and Poetics. He is author of Popular Music and Youth Culture: Music, Identity and Place (2000, Macmillan), Cultures of Popular Music (2001, Open University Press), Culture and Everyday Life (2005, Sage), editor of Remembering Woodstock (2004, Ashgate) and co-editor of Guitar Cultures (2001, Berg), After Subculture (Palgrave, 2004), Music Scenes (Vanderbilt University Press, 2004) and Music, Space and Place (Ashgate, 2004). Andy is a member of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) and a former Chair of the UK and Ireland IASPM branch. He is also a member of the British Sociological Association (BSA) and a co-founder of the BSA Youth Study Group. He is a Faculty Associate of the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University, an Associate of PopuLUs, the Centre for the Study of the World’s Popular Musics at Leeds University, and a member of the Board for the European Sociological Association Network for the Sociology of the Arts. Andy is also a member of the Editorial Boards for the journals Cultural Sociology, Perfect Beat, Leisure Studies and Music and Arts in Action, and serves on the Advisory Boards of the journals Sociology and the Journal of Sociology.

Claudio Benzecry 

University of Connecticut

Claudio Benzecry is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Connecticut. He received his Ph D in 2007 from New York University. His research is designed to develop fine-grained local analyses that provide micro foundations to the sociological study of larger comparative themes such as the emotional attachment to interpretative meanings and complex forms; the relationship between class, status and morality; and the production of cultural and artistic value. His work has appeared in venues such as Theory and Society, Qualitative Sociology, Theory, Culture & Society, Ethnography and the Annals of the American Academy of Social and Political Sciences. His research sites include Argentina and the US.

Claudio is currently working on three projects. The first one is the completion of a manuscript, The Opera Fanatic. Ethnography of an Obsession. Based on three years of fieldwork, archival research and 44 in depth interviews, this study serves to make more complex the relationship between engagement with high cultural products and the attainment of social status. Honor in this case is not related to how much recognition fans can gather from peers outside of the opera house or in how much they can convert their lifestyle in other resources but rather with how they craft themselves as honorable people.

The second project, is a stand-alone piece, in direct relation to his previous research. The objective of this particular archival study is to understand how much social closure the elites managed to produce on opera attendance in Buenos Aires during the foundational period of its main house, the Teatro Colón (1908-1931).

The third project, a collaboration with colleague Andrew Deener, will look at the micro level of the political economy of fashion globalization, focusing on trend forecasting agencies and second rate clothing and accessories companies and the ways in which they participate in producing both patterns of innovation and reproduction.

Mabel Berezin 

Cornell Univeristy

Berezin’s research asks how shared cultural meanings and practices shape 1) political institutions such as the state; 2) social processes around political movements and ideologies; and 3) agents through the construction of political identities. Her methodology is primarily comparative and historical. Her current work focuses on contemporary sites of social, political and cultural change – places where political arrangements have collapsed and new institutions and identities are in the process of formation. She is currently engaged in three projects: 1) a study of the social and cultural appeal of fringe parties in France and Italy as a response to Europeanization; 2) a comparative historical study of institution building, citizenship and social capital in early 20th century United States and Europe; and 3) the role of emotions in macrosociological systems (i.e., politics, economics).

Richard Biernacki 

University of California, San Diego

Rick Biernacki received his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley in 1989. In The Fabrication of Labor: Germany and Great Britain, 1640-1914 (University of California, 1995), he compares the influence of culture on the execution of factory manufacture. His interests are classical and contemporary theory, comparative method, and culture. His research focuses on the historical invention of key forms of cultural practice in Europe, including the categories of labor as a commodity, ethnic identity, and property in ideas.

Amy Binder 

University of California, San Diego

Amy Binder received her Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1998. Her principal research interests are in the areas of education, social movements, organizations, and cultural sociology. Her book, Contentious Curricula: Afrocentrism and Creationism in American Public Schools (Princeton University Press 2002), explores two marginal challenge efforts to shape curriculum in public school systems. The book received the 2003 Best Book Prize of the Culture Section of the American Sociological Association, the 2003 Distinguished Scholarship Prize of the Pacific Sociological Association, and the 2004 Outstanding Book Award from the American Educational Research Association (AERA). Her current research is on a transitional housing site in Denver, CO, which is an organization that mediates between the welfare state and individual residents’ lives. There she is studying issues of interpersonal and systems trust, with an emphasis on educational processes. She was a visiting scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation (2005-2006).

Mary Blair-Loy 

University of California, San Diego

Mary Blair-Loy has a B.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and an M.Div. from Harvard University. She uses multiple methods to study gender, work, and family, with a focus on how human agency is constrained and enabled by social and cultural structures. She studies elite workers in demanding and compelling jobs. Her book, Competing Devotions: Career and Family among Women Executives (Harvard University Press), shows how the morally and emotionally salient cultural schemas of work devotion and family devotion help structure the institutions of the capitalist firm and the nuclear family in the U.S. and help shape women’s actions. Competing Devotions won the 2005 William J. Goode Book Award, sponsored by the ASA Section on the Family. Her forthcoming work addresses these issues among male executives. Further, Blair-Loy analyzes the causes and consequences of the institutionalization of contested work-family olicies in a large financial services firm with Amy S. Wharton and studies organizational ideologies with Wharton and Jerry Goodstein.

Georgina Born 

University of Cambridge

Georgina Born is Reader in the Faculty of Social and Political Sciences at Cambridge University and a Fellow of Emmanuel College. She trained in Anthropology at University College London and uses ethnography to study cultural production, particularly music, television, IT and Euro-American knowledge systems and intellectual cultures. Her books are Uncertain Vision: Birt, Dyke and the Reinvention of the BBC (Vintage 2005), a study of the transformation of the BBC and Britain’s public broadcasting system over the past decade; Rationalizing Culture: IRCAM, Boulez and the Institutionalization of the Musical Avant-Garde (California 1995), a combined critical ethnography and cultural history of post-WW2 musical modernism and of music-science collaborations at IRCAM in Paris; and Western Music and Its Others: Difference, Representation and Appropriation in Music (California 2000, with D. Hesmondhalgh). Current research analyses the nature of interdisciplinary collaborations between the natural sciences and arts or social sciences. Other current research examines the transformation of public broadcasting with digitization, and the changing modes of creativity attendant on music’s digitization. Articles have appeared in the journals Screen, New Formations, Social Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, American Anthropologist, Journal of Material Culture, Modern Law Review, Cultural Values, Javnost/The Public, and Twentieth-Century Music. She is on the editorial advisory boards of the journals Anthropological Theory and New Media and Society, and is involved in media policy research on the BBC and public broadcasting in Europe, as well as advising public arts organisations in the UK. Her work is highly interdisciplinary, operating in dialogue with musicology, art history and science and technology studies, and combining perspectives from anthropology, sociology and the humanities.

Craig Calhoun 

Social Science Research Council and New York University

Craig Calhoun is President of the Social Science Research Council, a leading organization in international, interdisciplinary social science. He is also University Professor of Sociology and History at New York University. Calhoun’s newest book, Cosmopolitanism and Belonging will be published by Routledge in 2006. He has also just edited Sociology in America: the ASA Centennial History (Chicago 2006). Some of his other books include Nationalism (Minnesota, 1997), Neither Gods nor Emperors: Students and the Struggle for Democracy in China (California, 1995), and Critical Social Theory: Culture, History and the Challenge of Difference (Blackwell, 1995). A collection of his essays on 19th century social movements, The Radicalism of Tradition, will be published by the University of Chicago Press next year. Since 2002, Calhoun has been collaborating with Richard Sennett to sponsor a seminar and conference series linking graduate students in New York and London. The NYLON conferences focus on cultural analysis in its connections to political sociology, ethnography, social theory, sociology of knowledge, and cities. The first volume of essays from the NYLON conferences, Practicing Culture, will be published by Routledge in 2006. Formerly editor of Sociological Theory, Calhoun was the Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Dictionary of the Social Sciences, and co-editor for international and area studies in the International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences and co-editor of the Sage Handbook of Sociology. He has also edited (or co-edited) several influential and often agenda-setting volumes of interdisciplinary social theory including Habermas and the Public Sphere (MIT 1992), Bourdieu: Critical Perspectives (Chicago 1993), Social Theory and the Politics of Identity (Blackwell 1994), Hannah Arendt and the Meaning of Politics (Minnesota 1997), Understanding September 11th: Perspectives from the Social Sciences (New Press 2002), and Lessons of Empire? (New Press 2005). Several of these reflect his work at the SSRC or as one of the animators of the Center for Transcultural Studies, an international, interdisciplinary network of scholars in the humanities and social sciences.

John Carroll 

La Trobe University

John Carroll is Professor of Sociology at La Trobe University in Melbourne. He has degrees in mathematics, economics and sociology from the universities of Melbourne and Cambridge. His work over two decades has focussed on developing a theory of culture, with special reference to the modern West. The theory is presented in a sequence of books: The Wreck of Western Culture—Humanism Revisited (1993; revised edition 2004), Ego and Soul—the Modern West in Search of Meaning (1998; revised edition 2008), The Western Dreaming (2001), Terror—a Meditation on the Meaning of September 11 (2002), and The Existential Jesus (2007).

He has also edited Intruders in the Bush—the Australian Quest for Identity (1982, 1992). John Carroll is a frequent writer of essays and newspaper articles. He delivered one of the Alfred Deakin Federation Lectures in 2001—an overview of Australian culture titled ‘The Blessed Country’. He chaired a Panel commissioned by the Australian Government to review the National Museum of Australia in 2003.

Elaine Chan 

City University of Hong Kong

Elaine Chan was born and raised in Hong Kong. She received her undergraduate training in sociology and psychology at the University of San Diego and her graduate training in sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. She worked as a demonstrator at the Department of Politics and Public Administration before joining the Department in 1994.

Andrea Cossu 

University of New Haven

Andrea Cossu (PhD, Trento 2007) is currently a visiting assistant professor at the University of New Haven. He has done postdoctoral research at the University of Trento and Yale University. He is also an international fellow of the Warwick Center for Memory Studies. His research focuses mostly on political culture in Italy, with a particular focus on the relationship between narratives of the state and narratives of the opposition. He is currently working on two projects: a research on “Becoming communists in the 1940s”, which focuses on the emergence and success of non liberal political identities in transitions to democracy; and a book manuscript on Bob Dylan and the relationship between artists and audiences. He is also interested in the sociology of reputations, formal narrative methods in the social sciences, and the sociology of scandals. Publications include several articles in Italian and International peer-reviewed journals (Polis, Rassegna Italiana di Sociologia, Modern Italy, Journal of Classical Sociology, Memory Studies).

Simon Cottle 

Cardiff University

Simon Cottle is currently Professor of Media and Communications and Director of the Mediatized Conflict Research Group in the School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies at Cardiff University. He was formerly Inaugural Chair and Director of the Media and Communication Program at the University of Melbourne (2002-2006). He has written extensively on the changing professional practices, cultural forms and rituals of journalism and the mediatization of diverse conflicts including: riots, demonstrations and protests; the environment and “risk society;” “race,” racism and ethnicity; and war and terror post 9/11. His books include: Mediatized Conflict: New Developments in Media and Conflict Studies (Open University Press 2006), The Racist Murder of Stephen Lawrence: Media Performance and Public Transformation (Praeger 2004), Media Organization and Production (Editor, Sage 2003), News, Public Relations and Power (Editor, Sage 2003), Ethnic Minorities and the Media: Changing Cultural Boundaries (Editor, Open University Press 2000), Mass Communication Research Methods (Co-author, Palgrave 1998), Television and Ethnic Minorities: Producers’ Perspectives (Avebury 1997) and TV News, Urban Conflict and the Inner City (Leicester University Press 1993). He is currently writing Global Crisis Reporting (2007), and concluding an international research study examining the changing forms and flows of terrestrial and satellite television journalism in the USA, UK, Australia, India, South Africa and Singapore and how television journalism communicates global crises.

Thomas Cushman 

Wellesley College

Thomas Cushman is Professor of Sociology at Wellesley College and the founder, former editor in chief, and currently editor-at-large of the Journal of Human Rights. He has written or edited numerous books, including Notes from Underground: Rock Music Counterculture in Russia (State University of New York Press, 1995); This Time We Knew: Western Responses to Genocide in Bosnia (New York University Press, 1996); George Orwell: Into the Twenty-first Century (Paradigm, 2004); A Matter of Principle: Humanitarian Arguments for War in Iraq (University of California Press, 2005). His most recent fortcoming books include: Christopher Hitchens and His Critics: Terror, Iraq, and the Left (New York University Press, 2008), a compilation of writings of Hitchens and his critics, with an introduction (co-authored by Simon Cottee), which uses the polemical debates between Hitchens and his critics as a case study on sociology of intellectuals and the sociology of factionalism on the left; and The Religious in Response to Mass Atrocity, an interdisciplinary volume which examines the religious narratives, performances, cultural discourses, and institional responses to mass atrocity in history and in the contemporary world (under review, Cambridge University Press, e.d.p. 2008). Cushman is the editor of two book series: “Post-Communist Cultural Studies” and “Essays in Human Rights” – both published by Penn State University Press. He was a Mellon Foundation New Directions Fellow for 2002, a Fellow of the Salzburg Seminar Academic Core Session on International Law and Human Rights chaired by Lloyd Cutler and Richard Goldstone, a former visiting scholar at the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University, Siskind Visiting Professor of Sociology and Internet Studies at Brandeis University, and Visiting Professor of Law at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is currently at work on a manuscript tentatively entitled, “The Social Structure of Suffering” and will be the editor-in-chief of an encyclopedic Handbook of Human Rights, which will be published by Routledge in 2009.

Barbara Czarniawska 

Gothenburg Research Institute

Born 2nd December 1948 in Bialystok, Poland, where her family moved from Wilno after the World War II. Swedish citizen since 26 August, 1988. M.A. in Social and Industrial Psychology, Warsaw University, 1970; Ph.D.in Economic Sciences, Warsaw School of Economics, 1976. Czarniawska is a member of the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences, the Swedish Royal Engineering Academy, and the Royal Society of Art and Sciences in Gothenburg. She received Lily and Sven Thuréus Technical-Economic Award for internationally renowned research inorganization theory in 2000 and Wihuri International Prize in recognition of creative work that has specially furthered and developed the cultural and economic progress of mankind, 2003.

Eduardo de la Fuente 

Flinders University

Eduardo de la Fuente has an interdisciplinary background in the fields of communication studies, sociology and social theory. He has held positions at the University of Tasmania (1998-2001) and Macquarie University (2002-7) prior to coming to Monash University, and is currently a Faculty Fellow of the Yale Center for Cultural Sociology (2005- ). With Brad West of Flinders University, he co-convenes the TASA Cultural Sociology Thematic Group. He has published in journals such as Sociological Theory, Cultural Sociology, Journal of Classical Sociology, Journal of Sociology, European Journal of Social Theory, Thesis Eleven and Distinktion: The Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory. He is currently completing a scholarly monograph for Routledge on twentieth century music and the question of cultural modernity. His research interests are in the following areas: sociology of the arts; classical and contemporary social theory; the history of the social sciences; the aesthetics of everyday life; and the cultural dimensions of modernity.

Tia DeNora 

University of Exeter

My undergraduate degree was in music (flute) and sociology. I completed my Ph.D. in Sociology in 1989 at the University of California San Diego. From then until 1992, I worked at University of Wales Cardiff (where I was a University of Wales Fellow from 1989-91). I moved to Exeter in 1992. Most of my work has focused on musical topics, but I have also worked in the area of the sociology of science and technology. I was Chair of the European Sociological Association Network on Sociology of the Arts from 1999–2001 and am a member of the Board of the International Sociological Association Research Committee on Sociology of the Arts I was a board member of the ASA Section on Science, Knowledge and Technology from 1994–7. I co-edit the Manchester University Press series, Music and Society and serve on the editorial board of Qualitative Research and, from October 2003–5, American Journal of Sociology. At Exeter I am Head of Sociology. I also serve on the University’s Research Committee and am Deputy Director of the University Group on Equal Opportunities.

Laura Desfor Edles 

California State University, Northridge

Laura Desfor Edles teaches at California State University, Northridge, and Vanguard University of Southern California. She has also taught at Soka University, in Aliso Viejo, California; the University of Hawaii, Manoa; Boise State University, in Boise, Idaho, the University of California, Irvine, and the University of the Basque Country, San Sebastian, Spain. Edles received her B.A. from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of a number of books, including: Symbol and Ritual in the New Spain: The Transition to Democracy after Franco (Cambridge University Press, 1998), Cultural Sociology in Practice (Blackwell Publishers, 2002), Sociological Theory in the Classical Era (co-authored with Scott Appelrouth, Pine Forge, 2004), and Sociological Theory in the Contemporary Era (co-authored with Scott Appelrouth, Pine Forge, 2006). She has also published various articles on culture, theory, race/ethnicity, and social movements. Her current research focuses on Christianity in the public sphere, with an emphasis on progressive Christian interpretive frames. She seeks to explain what happened to the progressive Christian interpretive schemes prominent in the 1960s and 1970s (as evident in Jesus Christ Superstar, and the theology of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.), and how they came to be replaced by dichotomous “culture wars” between secular and religious fundamentalists which equate Christianity with conservatism.

Sarah Egan 

Bard College

Dissertation Topic: “Hounded out: Performative success and institutional failure in the pro-hunting movement”

Research interests: Sarah’s interests include cultural and political sociology, and particularly the study of social movements. Her dissertation research examines the cultural conflicts surrounding foxhunting and its prohibition in England.

Education: (B. Soc. Sc., M. Soc. Sc., National University of Ireland (UCD), M.A. Sociology, Yale University).

Nina Eliasoph 

University of Southern California

Nina Eliasoph’s research has focused on public speech in the U.S., asking how citizens and policy makers talk about politics and morality in the public arena. Her first book, Avoiding Politics: How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life (Cambridge University Press, 1998), is an ethnographic account of suburban activists, volunteers, and recreation club members describes how they talked — or did not talk — about politics, both within their groups and in their encounters with government, media and corporate authorities. Avoiding Politics won awards from the American Sociological Association’s Culture Section, the National Communication Association, and the Association for Humanistic Sociology. Eliasoph’s current book manuscript, Ambiguous Moral Worlds: The Case of U.S. Youth Programs, investigates a newly prevalent type of setting: after-school youth programs which are sponsored by a mixture of state agencies and large non-governmental agencies. She is also plannig a comparative ethnographic project with researchers in France, on questions of political and moral dialogue in institutionally ambiguous settings. Professor Eliasoph has served on the Sociology of Culture and the Political Sociology Councils of the American Sociological Association.

J. Nicholas Entrikin 

University of Notre Dame

J. Nicholas Entrikin, was appointed vice president and associate provost for internationalization at Notre Dame in July 2010.

Before coming to Notre Dame, Entrikin was vice provost of international studies at UCLA, where he had been a member of the faculty since 1975, teaching and conducting research in the general area of human geography with a focus on environmentalism and the cultural significance of place and landscape in modern societies. He reorganized UCLA’s International Institute into a university-wide organization with an expanded role as the university’s foreign affairs office for the university. Since 2003 he also had been a professor in UCLA’s Institute of the Environment.

A graduate of Syracuse University, Entrikin earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in geography from the University of Wisconsin. The author or editor of four books and the recipient of several fellowships and awards, he has been a Guggenheim Fellow, visiting director of research with the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Pau, France, and a faculty fellow at the Yale Center for Cultural Sociology.

As vice president for internationalization, Entrikin leads efforts to broaden Notre Dame’s international culture, programs, reach and reputation through expanded international research, collaborative projects and strategic relationships with global partners.

Gary Alan Fine 

Northwestern University

Gary Alan Fine is John Evans Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University. He received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the Department of Psychology and Social Relations at Harvard University, and has taught at the University of Minnesota and University of Georgia. For over thirty years he has studied the sociology of culture, primarily through historical case studies of the construction of reputations, ethnographic field investigations of small group culture, and social theory within the Goffmanian and interactionist tradition. Over the past 35 years, he has conducted ten ethnographies on sites including restaurant kitchens, Little League baseball, professional meteorology, and, currently, competitive chess. He is currently working on a project developing a “local sociology,” grounded on these ethnographic studies. He is the editor of Social Psychology Quarterly. (Visiting Fellow, Spring 2010)

Roger O. Friedland 

University of California, Santa Barbara

Roger Friedland teaches and researches in the areas of cultural analysis, religion and politics, social theory, and institutions.

Michael Galchinsky 

Georgia State University

Michael Galchinsky is Professor of English at Georgia State University (Ph.D. U.C. Berkeley, 1994). He is the author of Jews and Human Rights: Dancing at Three Weddings (Rowman and Littlefield, 2007) and The Origin of the Modern Jewish Woman Writer (Wayne State University Press, 1996). A collection he co-edited with David Biale and Susannah Heschel, Insider/Outsider: American Jews and Multiculturalism (University of California Press, 1998), has become a standard reference in Jewish and ethnic studies. In recent work he has focused on the development of human rights law and literature in the wake of 9/11. In “The Problem with Human Rights Culture,” published in South Atlantic Review, he develops a sociocultural approach to human rights literature that encompasses the modes of protest, testimony, lament, and laughter. His article, “A Sea Change in Security: How the ‘War on Terror’ Strengthened Human Rights,” forthcoming in the Journal of Conflict Studies, analyses changes in the UN Security Council’s approach to human rights in counter-terrorism. Synthesizing his interests in law and culture, he is now at work on “Bombing Buddha: Defending Cultural Rights after Bamiyan,” which explores the paradoxes and obstacles that confront the institutions designed to protect the world’s cultural treasures.

David W. Garland 

New York University

David Garland’s principle areas of research include: the legal institutions of punishment and control; history and sociology of criminological knowledge; social solidarity; and the welfare state.

J. William Gibson 

California State University, Long Beach

J. William Gibson attended the University of Texas at Austin (B.A. 1973) as an undergraduate, went to graduate school in sociology at Yale (Ph.D. 1985) and studied as a visiting graduate student at Brandeis University. Gibson was a post-doctoral fellow at Cornell University’s Society for the Humanities (1990–91). He is the author of The Perfect War: Technowar in Vietnam (1986 and 2000), and Warrior Dreams: Paramilitary Culture in Post-Vietnam America (1994). His articles, editorials, and book reviews have appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Harper’s, The Nation, and The Washington Post. Gibson is currently working on a new manuscript for Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt tentatively entitled Call of the Wild: the Cultural Re-Enchantment of Nature. It is a study in cultural sociology about how the environmental and animal rights movements of the past 35 years have revived and developed a romantic concept of nature, namely that the land and its creatures are in some sense sacred or enchanted. In this culture, landscapes, trees, coral reefs, and all kinds of animals are seen as having intrinsic value and integrity and participate in a larger spirit or mystery of nature. This new culture of enchantment breaks from what classical sociologists saw as fundamental processes of modernization, rationalization and secularization.

Bernhard Giesen 

University of Konstanz

Bernhard Giesen is interested in the comparative historical analysis of societies in Europe and of civilizations on a global level. Professor Giesen works within a culturalist framework, employing constructionist and evolutionary heuristics to examine the selective advantages of different cultural codings. This project has focussed on: (1) Comparative historical investigations of public opinion and of “collective identity” at both national and European levels, with reference to different codings of national identity; (2) The sociological analysis of intellectual rituals of discourse: the specific social embeddedness of intellectuals, their generation-specific position and their public self-thematization; and (3) The analysis of national rituals of remembrance and the differentiation and determination of function of different forms of collective memory. In this context the research is focusing on the historical change of remembrance rituals with regard to the conflicts between triumph and trauma.

Andreas Glaeser 

University of Chicago

Andreas Glaeser has begun work on a new monograph with the provisional title The Power of Recognition: Making Beliefs in the Secret Police and the Opposition of the former GDR. The central question this book pursues is why particular people believe in the veracity of a particular understanding of the world. The effort of Stasi, the GDR’s secret police, to control the civil rights movement in Berlin during the 1980s, is used here as a fruitful arena to develop new theoretical departures for a sociology of knowledge which focuses on epistemic practices and ideologies within social networks and bureaucratic organizations. He tries to show also that the reality construction frame offers a much better understanding of the peculiar interactions between opposition movements and security agencies in the late GDR which in turn can be used to unravel some of the mysteries about the cultural reasons why socialism has failed. Since this project has made wide use of archival materials to inform intensive interviews focusing on organizational lives, it also provides new methodological impulses for a historical ethnographic practice which employs organizations as ‘elevator’ between various levels of social organizations and as a “burning glasses” for diverse kinds of social processes which begin to interact within the organization. Andreas is also working on the role of emotions in cultural change and continues to pursue his interest in the configuration of architectural spaces as physical anchors of memories, identities and cultural codes.

Diane Grams
Loyola University Chicago

Diane Grams conducts research on urban art production. Her second book, Producing Local Color: Art Networks in Ethnic Chicago, (University of Chicago Press 2010), is an investigation of art producers in Chicago’s Bronzeville, Pilsen, and Rogers Park communities. In 2011, she was named a Faculty Fellow for the Yale Center for Cultural Sociology, an honor that places her in the company of some of the nation’s top cultural sociologists.

She is currently working on a number of articles on New Orleanian parading cultures and on third book comparing New Orleans to Chicago. A paper, “Freedom and Cultural Consciousness:Black Working Class Parades in Post-Katrina New Orleans,” was recently named “Best Conference Paper of the Year-2011″ by the Urban Affairs Association. The paper will appear in the Journal of Urban Affairs in the coming year (2012-2013). Video clips and photographs from this ethnographic research of public parades, Mardi Gras Indians and Sunday Second Line Parades can be seen on youtube and facebook.

Volker Heins 

Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI), Essen, Germany

Volker Heins is a senior fellow and head of the research unit “interculturality” at the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities (KWI), Essen, Germany. He also teaches political theory and political sociology in the faculty of social sciences at the University of Bochum. Before returning to Germany, he has taught and researched at various other places, including the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University, Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and, until recently, the Political Science Department at McGill University, Montreal. His publications include: Der Skandal der Vielfalt: Geschichte und Konzepte de Multikulturalismus [The Scandal of Diversity: History and Concepts of Multiculturalism] (2013); Beyond Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory (2011); Nongovernmental Organizations in International Society: Struggles over Recognition (2008); Rethinking Ethical Foreign Policy: Pitfalls, Possibilities and Paradoxes (co-edited with David Chandler, Routledge, 2007). Professor Heins was a CCS Visiting Fellow in the Spring of 2009.

Andreas Hess 

University College Dublin

Andreas Hess teaches sociology at University College Dublin. He was awarded a UCD President’s Fellowship for the academic year 2009/10 and is currently Research Fellow at the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale. He is interested in the life and work of the influential political theorist Judith N. Shklar, particularly how the experience of exile has shaped Shklar’s political theory. Recent publications: (as editor) Intellectuals and Their Publics: Perspectives from the Social Sciences, Farnham, Surrey 2009: Ashgate) and (as sole author) Reluctant Modernization: Plebeian Culture and Moral Economy in the Basque Country (Oxford 2009: Peter Lang). (Visiting Fellow, Fall 2009)
Recent publications
Curriculum Vitae

Dick Houtman 

University of Leuven, Belgium

Dick Houtman is Full Professor of Sociology of Culture and Religion at the University of Leuven, Belgium, and was a visiting fellow at Yale’s Center for Cultural Sociology (CCS) during the academic year 2012-2013. His principal research interest is how cultural changes since the 1960s have transformed various societal realms in the West, ranging from politics to consumption and from religion to popular culture. Most of his publications address either the emergence and electoral consequences of a new political culture, organized around cultural identity issues rather than distributive class issues, or the shift from church-based religion to institutionally unaffiliated spiritualities of life of the ‘New Age’ variety.

He has published about changes in political culture in journals like Politics and Society, Urban Affairs Review, European Journal of Political Research, Journal of European Social Policy, Social Forces and Public Opinion Quarterly (often with Peter Achterberg) and about the spiritual turn in the religious realm in, among others, Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Information, Communication and Society, Social Compass, Journal of Contemporary Religion and Annual Review of the Sociology of Religion (often with Stef Aupers). Recent international books are Things: Religion and the Question of Materiality (2012, co-edited with Birgit Meyer), Paradoxes of Individualization: Social Control and Social Conflict in Contemporary Modernity (2011, co-authored with Stef Aupers and Willem de Koster), Religions of Modernity: Relocating the Sacred to the Self and the Digital (2010, co-edited with Stef Aupers), and Farewell to the Leftist Working Class (2008, co-authored with Peter Achterberg and Anton Derks).

Nicolas Howe 

Williams College

Nicolas Howe is Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at Williams College with affiliations in Sociology and American Studies. Trained as a cultural geographer, he studies the role of place, space, and landscape in social life. His research focuses on the intersection of religious and environmental politics in modern America, and he has strong interests in sociolegal studies, environmental history, and visual culture studies. He is currently writing a book on space, secularism, and American civil society. In 2013-2014 he will be visiting Harvard University as a Warren Fellow.

Ronald Jacobs 

State University of New York, Albany

Ron Jacobs is the author of Race, Media, and the Crisis of Civil Society: From Watts to Rodney King (Cambridge University Press, 2000), in addition to other articles published in such journals as International Sociology, the American Journal of Sociology, Sociological Theory, Media, Culture and Society, Voluntas, and Research in Political Sociology. His new project is a study of television, entertainment, and the public sphere. Professor Jacobs was a CCS Visiting Fellow from 2003–2004.

Nadya Jaworsky 

Masaryk University

Dissertation Title: “It’s Just Not Main Street Anymore…!” Mapping out the Boundaries of Belonging in a New Immigrant Gateway

Education: M.A., M.Phil – Yale University (2009); Ph.D. Sociology – Yale University (2011)

Kay Junge 

Konstanz University

Anne E. Kane 

University of Houston – Downtown

Anne Kane received her Ph.D. from UCLA. Her main research interests include social theory, cultural analysis, and political and historical sociology; she has published articles on all these subjects. A recent Fulbright scholar in Ireland, Dr. Kane is currently working on a book about meaning construction, ideology and political alliance during the Irish Land War.

Thomas Kern 

Max Weber Center for Advanced Studies, University of Erfurt

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Farhad Khosrokhavar 

Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) – Cadis

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Agnes Ku 

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

Agnes Ku is Associate Professor of Sociology at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (1995), and was Assistant Professor of Sociology at Hong Kong Polytechnic University (1993–2000). She researches in the areas of cultural sociology, civil society and the public sphere, Hong Kong culture and politics, and gender issues. Professor Ku’s current projects include two separate Hong Kong-based studies, one in civil society and citizenship rights in Hong Kong, and the other on rights discourse.

Krishan Kumar 

University of Virginia

Krishan Kumar is William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Sociology at the University of Virginia. He was previously Professor of Social and Political Thought at the University of Kent at Canterbury, England. He received his undergraduate education at the University of Cambridge and his postgraduate education at the London School of Economics. Mr. Kumar has at various times been a Talks Producer at the BBC, a Visiting Scholar at Harvard University, and has held Visiting Professorships at the University of Colorado at Boulder, the Central European University, Prague, the University of Bergen, Norway, and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris. Among his publications are Prophecy and Progress: The Sociology of Industrial and Post-Industrial Society, Utopia and Anti-Utopia in Modern Times, The Rise of Modern Society, From Post-Industrial to Post-Modern Society, 1989: Revolutionary Ideas and Ideals, and The Making of English National Identity. Mr. Kumar’s current interests focus on nationalism and national identity. Related research involves work on European identity in the context of transnational migration and challeges to the Nation-state. He is also preparing a study of current approaches to historical sociology.

Dmitry Kurakin 

National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow

Dmitry Kurakin is a senior research fellow at the Centre for Fundamental Sociology (CFS), State University – Higher School of Economics in Moscow, and head of the Cultural Sociology Research Group (at the CFS). He also teaches at the faculty of philosophy in Higher School of Economics and at the department of sociology in Moscow School of Social and Economic Sciences. Basically he works in a field of sociological theory, Durkheimian program, and cultural sociology focusing particular attention on the theory of the sacred. Another area of professional work embraces a wide scope of research activities in such spheres as education, ecology and social policy. During the time since 2004 he has elaborated, conducted and supervised a number of large-scale national monitoring projects and cross-national surveys in all countries of former Soviet Union, Serbia and Albania, initiated by the World Bank, Ministry of Education and Science of Russia, State University – Higher School of Economics and other institutions. Dmitry Kurakin is author of three books and number of articles in such fields and issues as social theory and methodology, cultural sociology, education, technology and others. His current and forthcoming works concentrate upon emotional marking out of meaningful life, symbolic mechanisms of pollution and desecration, metaphors and models of the body in cultural sociology explanatory schemes, problem of observation and development of failure/conflict/misconduct analysis methodologies in sociological research.

Fuyuki Kurasawa 

York University

Fuyuki Kurasawa was a Fulbright Scholar at New York University and a CCS Visiting Fellow at Yale University in 2003–2004. Professor Kurasawa has also been a Commonwealth Fellow and Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Postdoctoral Fellow, and was named a “Young Canadian Leader” by The Globe and Mail in 2000. He is currently writing two books, To Do Onto Others: Theorizing Practices of Global Justice, and Intersections and Interventions: Canadian Essays in Cultural Materialism, as well as acting as a consulting editor for the forthcoming Routledge Encyclopedia of Social Theory.

Scott Lash 

Goldsmiths, University of London

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Paul Lichterman 

University of Southern California

Paul Lichterman is Associate Professor of Sociology and Religion at USC, and Associate Professor of Sociology on leave from the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Paul received the Ph.D. at Berkeley in 1992. He studies civic organizations, religious groups, and social movements. He tries to appreciate both the patterned, often story-like quality of cultural forms and the patterned, group practices that make those forms meaningful in particular ways. His first book, The Search for Political Community, shows how Americans sometimes use their individualism to sustain long-term commitments to social change. His second book, Elusive Togetherness: Church Groups Trying to Bridge America’s Divisions compares nine religiously based community service groups in a Midwestern city, as they try hard but often fail to build civic bridges with other community groups, social service agencies, and low-income people. The book shows how and why communication about social ties is crucial to creating them. Paul has published in American Journal of Sociology, Sociological Theory, Theory and Society and other journals, won awards for published articles, and enjoyed fellowships at Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania.

Orvar Löfgren 

University of Lund

Over the last years my research has centered around the study of national identities and transnational movements in an everyday perspective, as well as on tourism, travel and the cultural analysis of consumption. Earlier research interests have included studies of class and culture building, but also Scandinavian peasant life and family organization, as well as studies of maritime communities.

Anna Lund 

Linnaeus University, Sweden

Anna Lund (PhD) is a senior university lecturer in sociology at Linnaeus University, Sweden. She is also co-director of the Center for Cultural Sociology, Linnaeus University, and co-coordinator for the Swedish network promoting research within the sector for art and culture. Anna is currently engaged in several research projects concerning youth and internet cultures, artistic education and gender awareness as well as school achievement and multicultural incorporation. Among her recent publications are titles such as: Relational aesthetics – concrete and abstract (2010), “Of course there’s filth too.” Staging gender – on and off stage (2009), Critique of the construction of statistical categories in sports and cultural activities (2009), Stage-Audience Encounter: a cultural sociological analysis of youth theatre (2008, doctoral thesis). (Visiting Fellow, Spring 2010)

Gordon Lynch 

University of Kent

Sven_Axel Mansson 

Malmö University

Professor in social work, PhD. Research area: Gender, sexuality and social work.

Radim Marada 

Masaryk University

Radim Marada gained his PhD in Sociology from the Graduate Faculty of Political and Social Science of the New School for Social Research, in 1995. Currently he chairs the Department of Sociology at the Faculty of Social Studies of the Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic. He also leads a research team “Ethnization, Migration, Identity” in the Masaryk University’s Institute for the Study on Social Reproduction and Integration. He is the editor in chief of the academic journal Social Studies. His major areas of interest are sociological theory and history of social thought, cultural sociology, generations and generational conflict, civil society. Among his recent publications, there are Culture of Protest: Politicization of Everyday Life (2003) and Ethnic Diversity and Civic Unity (2006, editor).

Jason Mast 

Warwick University

Lisa McCormick 

Haverford College

Lisa McCormick is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Haverford College on a tenure-track appointment. She teaches and conducts research in the areas of cultural sociology, sociology of the arts, self and identity, social theory, and qualitative methods. Her article, “Higher, Faster, Louder: Representations of the International Music Competition” is forthcoming in Cultural Sociology. She is also co-editor, with Ron Eyerman, of Myth, Meaning and Performance: Toward a New Cultural Sociology of the Arts (Paradigm 2006). Prof. McCormick graduated from Rice University with a B.Mus in Cello Performance and a B.A. in Sociology, both summa cum laude. She was a Rhodes Scholar (Alberta & Corpus Christi 1998), earning a Master of Philosophy in “Music: Performance and Interpretation” from Oxford University. She recently completed her graduate work in Sociology at Yale University.

Prof. McCormick currently serves on the editorial board for the interdisciplinary online journal Music & Art in Action.

Kate Nash 

Goldsmiths, University of London

Kate Nash is interested in the way in which culture and politics are entangled. Her recent book, The Cultural Politics of Human Rights: Comparing the US and UK (Cambridge University Press 2009), focused on the way the authority to define human rights is culturally constructed in the judiciary, government, social movement organisations and the media in the context of state transformation in networks of global governance. She has also recently published a second edition of Contemporary Political Sociology: globalization, politics, and power (Blackwell 2010), which deals with cultural politics in relation to globalization, social movements, citizenship and democracy; and edited New Critical Readings in Political Sociology with Alan Scott and Anna Marie Smith (Ashgate 2009).

Matthew Norton 

University of Oregon

Sherry B. Ortner 

University of California, Los Angeles

The first half of my career was concerned, empirically, with the Sherpa people of Nepal, and produced a number of books, articles, and a film. The most recent of the books is Life and Death on Mt. Everest: Sherpas and Himalayan Mountaineering. Starting in the early ’90s, however, I began shifting my research over to the United States, with special focus on social class in America, but also covering a wide range of other issues. I have just finished my first book from this project, New Jersey Dreaming: Capital, Culture and the Class of ’58. I am thinking of doing at least one more American project, probably concerned with “Generation X” and the remaking of American consciousness since the 1970s. I have also had an ongoing interest in social, cultural, and feminist theory. I am currently working on a series of papers about the status of “the subject” (the person, the actor, the agent, the individual, etc. – all different, of course) in social and cultural theory.

Sunwoong Park 

Korea National University of Education

Sunwoong Park (Ph.D., Sociology, UCLA) is an associate professor of the Department of Social Studies, the Korea National University of Education in South Korea. He has researched on youth subculture, consumption and class identity, media discourse, and social movements. He has just finished an article on the ritualization of social movements (in Korean) and is now working on the politics of representation on educational crisis, drawing upon Alexander’s model of civil discourses. He translated one of Alexander’s books, The Meanings of Social Life into Korean. Professor Park was a CCS Visiting Fellow for the 2007-2008 academic year.

Valentin Rauer 

Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany

Valentin Rauer received his doctorate (Dr. rer. soc.) in sociology from Konstanz University in 2006 and works as senior research fellow at Goethe-University Frankfurt/M. He is interested in social and cultural processes that transform, transmit and translate the past (collective memories and identities), and the future (security cultures and risks). His work in cultural sociology, migration studies, and collective memory studies traces how contingent events, narratives, visuals, materials and performances transform and translate the collective space of experiences and the horizon of expectations. In his empirical research, he focuses on the transformation of transnational integration discourses in Germany, transnational rituals of reconciliation, WWII, the visual translation of risks, and material cultures of security. Furthermore, he teaches and publishes on qualitative and quantitative research methods. His articles have been published in Sociologia Internationalis, Berliner Journal f. Soziologie and Security and Peace (among others). He is co-editor of Die Einhegung des Anderen [The Containment of the Other], VS-Verlag, 2004, Konjunkturen der Integration [Cycles of Integration], Special Issue of Sociologia Internationalis, 2011 and Sicherheitskultur [Security Culture], Campus 2012.

Isaac Reed 

University of Colorado at Boulder

Isaac Reed received his Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University in 2007. He is interested in the social and cultural processes that transform worldviews, discursive formations, institutional regimes, narrative frameworks, etc. His work in epistemology, social theory, and the philosophy of social science is directed towards showing how interpretive sociology can be rigorous and explanatory without being scientistic. His empirical research focuses on the transformation of Early America 1680-1720, with a particular interest in the Salem Witch Trials. More broadly, he is concerned with identifying the cultural shifts that contribute to the onset of “modernity.” He is the author of articles published in Sociological Theory and Cultural Sociology, and the co-editor of Culture, Society, and Democracy: The Interpretive Approach (Paradigm, 2007), and Meaning and Method: The Cultural Approach to Sociology (Paradigm, Forthcoming).

Alexander Riley 

Bucknell University

Alexander Riley received his Ph. D from the University of California, San Diego in 2000. He is the author of Godless Intellectuals?: The Intellectual Pursuit of the Sacred Reinvented and Impure Play: Sacredness, Transgression, and the Tragic in Popular Culture. He is currently working on a study of the memorialization of the site of United Flight 93 in Shanksville, Pennsylvania that explores American cultural narratives on heroism and violent death.

Magnus Ring 

Lund University

I gained my PhD in sociology at Lund University 2007 and in 2009 I was appointed as a Senior Lecturer in Sociology at the department of Sociology, Lund University. My PhD thesis analyzes the concept formation of ‘social movements’, partly based upon previous work in a EU-funded research project, investigating the environmental movement’s impact on technology and policymaking and another EU-funded research project that was mapping environmental activism in Western Europe. Both before and after my PhD I conducted research on collective creative processes in the arts and the relationship between particular places/“space” and creative actors/industry using theories on performance and gentrification.

After my PhD I also have conducted research on the experiences of “being old”, and in particular how elderly people handle their everyday life situations based upon their previous life experiences once they are in need of support from the welfare system. Both the research on the environmental movements and on the elderly has been made in research teams and in an international comparative context. As my overarching research interest is centered on the question of how collective meaning are acted out by collective and/or individuals my present research is focused on the relationship between collective cultural representations and action, at the moment focusing on manifestos and terrorist activity.

In relation to the field of welfare studies I also have been collaborating with colleagues in eastern Asia. I have spent one month on an Erasmus Mundus External Cooperation Window scholarship at Fudan University in Shanghai, China in 2010 and participated in a Sweden-China Research link funded by The Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet). I spent one semester as visiting fellow at the Center for Cultural Sociology (CCS) at Yale University during the fall of 2011.

Erik Ringmar 

Shanghai Jiaotong University

Erik Ringmar is Zhi Yuan Chair professor of International Relations at Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China PRC. He graduated with a PhD in political science from Yale University and for 12 years he taught courses in comparative politics in the Government Department at London School of Economics and Political Science. He has written books on the origin of the state in the 17th century, on why European societies became “modern” before East Asian societies, on how best to survive capitalism, and on how the Internet has changed the notion of freedom of speech. His most recent work, Liberal Barbarism, discusses the European destruction of Yuanmingyuan, the palace of the emperor of China, in 1860. His next project will deal with boredom and violence. Ringmar has four beautiful and multi-talented daughters and one dumb dog. He likes to eat curries.

Jonathan Roberge

Assistant Professor, Institut national de la recherche scientifique, Université du Quebec

Victor Roudometof  

University of Cyprus

Victor Roudometof is Associate Professor of sociology with the Department of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Cyprus. He is the author of two monographs and editor of several additional volumes on American culture, glocalization, cosmopolitanism, nationalism, transnationalism & religion. His main research interests are in the areas of cultural sociology and sociology of religion. His latest volume is Orthodox Christianity in 21st Century Greece: The Role of Religion in Politics, Ethnicity and Culture (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010). He has also co-edited a special issue of the Greek language journal Science and Society on cultural trauma (2012). Currently, he is working on a monograph examining the historical transformations of Eastern Orthodox Christianity in the context of historical globalization. Full profile available on line at www.roudometof.com

 

Michael Schudson 

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Michael Schudson grew up in Milwaukee, Wisc. He received a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1976 to 1980 and at the University of California, San Diego from 1980 to 2009. From 2005 on, he split his teaching between UCSD and the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, becoming a full-time member of the Columbia faculty in 2009.

He is the author of six books and editor of two others concerning the history and sociology of the American news media, advertising, popular culture, Watergate and cultural memory. He is the recipient of a number of honors; he has been a Guggenheim fellow, a resident fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, and a MacArthur Foundation “genius” fellow. In 2004, he received the Murray Edelman distinguished career award from the political communication section of the American Political Science Association and the International Communication Association.

Schudson’s articles have appeared in the Columbia Journalism Review, Wilson Quarterly, and The American Prospect, and he has published op-eds in The New York Times, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, Newsday, the Financial Times, and The San Diego Union.

Giuseppe Sciortino 

University of Trento

Giuseppe Sciortino is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Trento, Italy. His interests includes Social Theory, Migration Theory and Cultural Sociology.

Recent publications

Margaret Somers 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Margaret Somers is Professor of Sociology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She researches in the areas of Political Sociology, Law, Sociology of Citizenship, Economic Sociology, Comparative History, Social and Political Theory, and the Sociology of Knowledge.

Julia Sonnevend

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Julia Sonnevend is Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan. She has been named a Lady Davis Fellow at the Smart Family Institute of Communications at the Hebrew University and an Associate Postdoctoral Fellow at the Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace (she will be in Jerusalem from December 2013 until September 2014).
Sonnevend’s interdisciplinary research examines the cultural sociological aspects of global media, with a special focus on media events, rituals, performances, symbols and icons. Inspired by Daniel Dayan’s and Elihu Katz’s Media Events, her current book project explores how a complex local news event may become a universalized global social myth. Her research interests also include social theory, visual culture, narratives of political, social and cultural trauma, and the intellectual history of communication research.
Julia Sonnevend received her Ph.D. in Communications from Columbia University, her Master of Laws degree from Yale Law School and her Juris Doctorate and Master of Arts degrees in German Studies and Aesthetics from Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest. Julia’s website

Ivana Spasic 

Belgrade University

Ivana Spasic is Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Belgrade, Serbia, teaching sociological theory, sociology of everyday life and theories of culture. She is currently involved in projects examining the place of culture, discourse and collective memory in processes of postsocialist transformation. From 2007 to 2010 she was the editor of the leading Serbian sociological journal, Sociologija. Ivana Spasic has authored or coauthored several books in Serbian, including Politics of Everyday Life: Serbia 1999-2002 (2003), an empirical study of mundane experiences of political change, a theoretical treatise Sociologies of Everyday Life (2004), and edited volumes Interpretative Sociology (1998), and Legacy of Pierre Bourdieu (2006). Her recent publications include »The trauma of Kosovo in Serbian national narratives«, in R. Eyerman, J.C. Alexander, and E.B. Breese, Narrating Trauma: On the Impact of Collective Suffering (2010). Ivana Spasic was a Fulbright Visiting Fellow at CCS in Spring 2009.

Lynette Spillman 

University of Notre Dame

Lynette Spillman’s research is animated by curiosity about the ways meso-level processes of meaning-making interact with macro-level historical processes. Nation and Commemoration: Creating National Identities in the United States and Australia (Cambridge University Press, 1997) explores these issues in a comparative historical study of the long-term cultural production of national identities in two similar settler societies. Her current research, supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship and an ASA/NSF Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline Award, investigates the cultural construction of economic action in business associations. She has pursued her interest in developing cultural sociology in several articles on culture and social structure, as well as by editing Cultural Sociology (Blackwell, 2002), and co-editing (with Mark Jacobs) the Spring 2005 issue of Poetics on “Cultural Sociology and Sociological Publics.” Other interests are represented in articles on theories of nationalism, on collective memory, and on causal reasoning. Professor Spillman was a CCS Visiting Fellow in Spring 2006.

George Steinmetz 

University of Michigan

George Steinmetz is professor of sociology and German studies at the University of Michigan and Visiting Professor at the New School for Social Research. He is the author of The Devil’s Handwriting: Precoloniality and the German Colonial State in Qingdao, Samoa, and Southwest Africa (University of Chicago Press, 2007) and Regulating the Social: The Welfare State and Local Politics in Imperial Germany (Princeton University Press, 1993), editor of The Politics of Method in the Human Sciences: Positivism and its Epistemological Others (Duke University Press, 2005) and State/Culture: State Formation after the Cultural Turn (Cornell University Press, 1999), and co-director with Michael Chanan of the film “Detroit; Ruin of a City” (Bristol Docs/Intellect Books, 2006). Together with Julia Adams he edits the book series “Politics, History, and Culture” at Duke University Press. He is currently working on a book on the entanglements of German, French, British, and American sociology with imperialism and a new film with Michael Chanan on the economic crisis of 2008 and the crisis of the economics discipline. He is also a member of the scientific coouncil of the département de sciences sociales at the Ecole normale supérieure and a Corresponding Member of the Centre de Sociologie européenne.

Daniel Šuber 

Luzerne University

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Kenneth A. Thompson 

The Open University

Kenneth A. Thompson is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the Open University. He teaches and researches in the areas of culture, media and identities; cultural governance; ethnicity; and French social theory. Professor Thompson is an associate member of the ESRC Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change, Open University/Manchester University; and the Center for Cultural Sociology, Yale University. His recent publications include “Sociology and Christianity,” in J. Bowden (ed.), Christianity: A Complete Guide, London and New York, Continuum Books, 2005; the “Introductory Essay” to K. Thompson (ed.), The Early Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, London, Routledge, 8 vols., 2005; and “Durkheimian Cultural Sociology and Cultural Studies,” Thesis Eleven, no. 79, Nov. 2004, 16-24.

Edward A. Tiryakian 

Duke University

Edward Tiryakian is Professor of Sociology at Duke University where he has served as departmental Chair and as Director of International Studies (1989–91). He recently served as Distinguished Leader of the Fulbright New Century Scholars Program, 2002–2003. The focus of the program was for a multidisciplinary team of 30 scholars, two-thirds from overseas, to study comparatively severe ethnic conflicts and peace processes. He has served as President of the American Society for the Study of Religion (1981–84) and of the International Association of French-Speaking Sociologists (1988–1992). Tiryakian has also chaired the Theory Section of the American Sociological Association and served as Chair of the ASA History of Sociology section in 2005–06. He has had visiting appointments at Laval University (Quebec), the Institut d’Etudes Politiques (Paris), and the Free University of Berlin. In recent years he has given seminars on European Unity, History of Social Thought, Sociology of Religion, Modern Nationalist Movements and cultural and political aspects of Globalization. As a scholar he has visited France, Italy, Lebanon, Israel, Korea, Australia and China.

Carlo Tognato 

National University of Colombia, Bogotá

Carlo Tognato is Associate Professor at the Department of Sociology and at the Center for Social Studies of the National University of Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia) and Fellow at the Indo-Pacific Governance Centre at the University of Adelaide. His recent publications include Central Bank Independence: Cultural Codes and Symbolic Performance (New York: Palgrave-Macmillan, 2012), “Culture and the Economy” in The Oxford Handbook of Cultural Sociology, edited by Jeffrey Alexander, Ron Jacobs, and Philip Smith, Phillip (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012), and “Extending Trauma across Cultural Divides: On Kidnapping and Solidarity in Colombia” in Narrating Trauma: Studies in the Contingent Impact of Collective Suffering, edited by Jeffrey Alexander, Ron Eyerman, and Elizabeth Butler Breese (Boulder: Paradigm Publishers, 2011). He is currently working on a new project about tax cultures.

Mats Trondman 

Linnaeus University

Mats Trondman is Professor of Cultural Sociology at the Center for Cultural Sociology, Linnaeus University in Sweden. He was the founding editor of the Sage journal Ethnography together with Paul Willis, with whom he also wrote the “Manifesto for Ethnography” in 2000. Over the years Trondman has covered a large number of theoretically informed empirical research topics such as: musical taste and lifestyle; social and cultural mobility; counter cultures; the transformation of the Swedish Welfare Society during 1990s; sports; the Arts; social and cultural policy; childhood studies, issues of multiculturalism, education, and schooling. His main focus is youth culture research and social and cultural theory which often combines with aspects of political philosophy. He has published eight books in Swedish. The most well known is on class travelling, that is, working class kids becoming academics. He has also published more than hundred articles and reports, as well as being a public speaker, columnist and occasional writer for the Art pages in the Swedish press. Trondman is currently working on a large research project in Malmö, Sweden – An Educational Dilemma: School Achievement and Multicultural Incorporation – financed by the Swedish Research Council. The project is informed by Jeffrey C. Alexander’s cultural sociology. He is also collaborating with Paul Willis and John Hughes on a book on socio-symbolic homologies.

Bryan S. Turner 

National University of Singapore

Bryan S. Turner is Professor of Sociology at the National University of Singapore. He researches in the areas of medical sociology (body and society); political sociology (citizenship and human rights); the sociology of religion (Islam); and classical social theory. At NUS Turner directs research on globalisation and religion concentrating on such issues as religious conflict and the modern state, religious authority and electronic information, religious, consumerism and youth cultures, human rights and religion, the human body, medical change and religious cosmologies. The general aim of this work is to develop a comprehensive overview of the impact of globalisation on religions, and the consequences of religion on global processes.

Diane Vaughan 

Columbia University

Diane Vaughan is Professor of Sociology at Columbia University. She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Ohio State University (1979), and taught at Boston College from 1984 to 2005. During this time, she has been awarded fellowships at Yale (1979 82), Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford (1986–87), The American Bar Foundation (1988–1989), The Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton (1996–1997), and John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation (2003–04). Her interests are the sociology of organizations, sociology of culture, deviance and social control, field methods, research design, and science, knowledge, and technology. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses on these topics; she also teaches in the undergraduate Honors Program. Much of her research has examined the “dark side” of organizations: mistake, misconduct, and disaster. Her books are Controlling Unlawful Organizational Behavior, Uncoupling, and The Challenger Launch Decision. The latter was awarded the Rachel Carson Prize, the Robert K. Merton Award, Honorable Mention for Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship of the American Sociological Association, and was nominated for the National Book Award and Pulitzer Prize. As a result of her analysis of the causes of the Challenger accident, she was asked to testify before the Columbia Accident Investigation Board in 2003, then became part of the Board’s research staff, working with the Board to analyze and write the section of the Report identifying the social causes of the Columbia accident.

Vered Vinitzky-Seroussi 

Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Vered’s academic interest focused in the last decade on the notions of collective memory and commemorations at the macro social level. More specifically, she is curious about the ways in which societies cope with their difficult pasts, embarrassing moments, shameful events and the like. Within that framework, she is working on the ingredients from which the sociology of commemoration is made (time, space, discourse and agency) and on commemoration as a lens through which one can study various social groups more generally. In addition, she is interested in the city as a text, in autobiographical occasions, in the sociology of courtrooms, in the notions of silence and forgetting and in the ways in which death is announced and managed. Her research agendas spin themselves out between the emotional turbulence of the high school reunion in the United States (see under After Pomp and Circumstance, University of Chicago Press, 1998) the commemoration of an assassinated Prime Minister in the context of the fractured collective identity of society in Israel (see under, Yitzhak Rabin Assassination and the Dilemmas of Commemoration, State University of New York Press, 2009); between the knock on the door which announces the worst news of all and the everyday drama of the courtroom. In each instance, an autobiographical occasion of crisis at the individual, the organizational or the national level occupies center stage, as do questions of memory and identity, the management of emotion and the quest for meaning within the constraints and opportunities afforded by culture and social structures. She is currently editing [together with Jeffrey K. Olick and Daniel Levy] The Collective Memory Reader (Oxford University Press, forthcoming). (Visiting Fellow, August 2009 – August 2010)

Robin Wagner-Pacifici
The New School for Social Research

Robin Wagner-Pacifici is interested in the analysis of interstitial moments in social and political contexts (including standoffs and surrenders), with a methodological approach that includes discourse analysis, semiotic analysis of visual material, hermeneutics.

Brad West 

University of South Australia

My research focuses on the changing dynamics of national collective memory. This involves examination of the way history is remembered, in particular through the commemoration of significant national events, and accounting for the power of these pasts in shaping social action, meaning and contestation in contemporary social life. Current research projects include analysis of the narratives and memorialisation surrounding the 2002 Bali Bombing; the rise of ‘dark tourism’ at war sites in Vietnam and pilgrimage like activity at the WWI Gallipoli battlefields in Turkey. I have also written widely on the state of cultural theory and contours of the sub-discipline cultural sociology.

Robert Witkin 

University of Exeter

Robert Witkin is Professor of Sociology at the University of Exeter. He graduated from the University of Leeds in Sociology and Psychology, and obtained his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Exeter. He was appointed to a lectureship in Sociology at Exeter in 1967, where he served as Research Director of the School’s Council Curriculum Development Project “Arts and the Adolescent” (1969–1972). Witkin is a former Consultant to Dartington College of Arts and a member of its Board of Governors. He is also a founding member of the Board of the Standing Conference on Organizational Symbolism (SCOS) and a contributor to many of its international conferences. Witkin is also a member of the British Sociological Association, the European Sociological Association and the International Sociological Association.

Eric Woods 

University of East London

Eric is Lecturer in Sociology at the University of East London; a member of the editorial team of the journal Nations and Nationalism; and a Faculty Advisor to the LSE-based Association for the Study of Ethnicity and Nationalism. Eric’s current interests are in the symbolic politics of nationalism, empire, conflict, and redress. He recently completed a book project on the collective acknowledgement of injustice, and is now at the outset of a comparative study of imperial identities.

Ian Woodward 

Griffith University

Ian Woodward is Senior Lecturer in sociology in the School of Humanities, Griffith University, Australia, and Deputy Director of the Centre for Public Culture and Ideas at Griffith University. His research on material culture, consumption, taste and performativity is widely published in journals such as The Sociological Review, Poetics, Journal of Sociology, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Journal of Material Culture and The British Journal of Sociology. His materialized, cultural reconstruction of the field of consumption studies, ‘Understanding Material Culture’, was published by Sage in 2007. Woodward is also researching dimensions and practices of cultural openness and his research on cosmopolitanism (most of which is co-authored with Zlatko Skrbis and Gavin Kendall) has been published in journals such as Theory, Culture and Society, The Sociological Review, Journal of Sociology and The British Journal of Sociology. Their collaborative research in this area, which connects classical sociological theory to ideas on mobility, hospitality, technology and community, ‘The Sociology of Cosmopolitanism’, was published by Palgrave in 2009. Presently, Woodward is collaborating with an international team of authors on an introduction to cultural sociology and is also working on another book dealing with cosmopolitanism. Woodward has served on the Executive Board of The Australian Sociological Association and is currently an Editor of The Journal of Sociology.

Selected publications:

Kendall, G., Woodward, I., Skrbis, Z. 2009. The Sociology of Cosmopolitanism, London: Palgrave Macmillan.
Woodward, I. 2007. Understanding Material Culture, London: Sage.
Woodward, I., Skrbis, Z., and Bean, C. 2008. ‘Attitudes toward globalization and cosmopolitanism: Cultural diversity, personal consumption and the national economy’, The British Journal of Sociology, 59(1): 207-226.
Skrbis, Z., and Woodward, I. 2007. ‘The ambivalence of ordinary cosmopolitanism: Investigating the limits of cosmopolitan openness’ The Sociological Review, 55:4, 730-747.
Woodward, I. 2006. ‘Investigating the consumption anxiety thesis: aesthetic choice, narrativisation and social performance’, The Sociological Review, 54(2): 263-282.
Skrbis, Z., Kendall, G., and Woodward, I. 2004. ‘Locating Cosmopolitanism: Between Humanist Ideal and Grounded Social Category’, Theory, Culture and Society, 21(5): 115-136.
Woodward, I. 2003. ‘Divergent narratives in the imagining of the home amongst middle-class consumers: aesthetics, comfort and the symbolic boundaries of self and home’, Journal of Sociologyy, 39(4): 391-412.
Woodward, I., and Emmison, M. 2001. ‘From aesthetic principles to collective sentiments: the logics of everyday judgements of taste’, Poetics, 29(6): 295-316.
Woodward, I. 2001. ‘Domestic objects and the taste epiphany: a resource for consumption methodology’ Journal of Material Culture, 6(2): 115-36.

Michael Yarbrough

John Jay College (CUNY)

Yarbrough’s research focuses on law’s role in everyday concepts of “marriage” and “family,” with a special interest in the consequences of this relationship for intersecting hierarchies of race, gender, and sexuality. His current book manuscript explores these themes through comparative ethnographic research among two groups recently incorporated into South African marriage law: those living in areas governed by indigenous or “customary” law; and those who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender. His article on the making of these new marriage laws is forthcoming in Social Politics. Yarbrough holds both a JD and a PhD in sociology from Yale, where he won a Fulbright-Hays dissertation fellowship, and he is now an Assistant Professor of law and society in the Department of Political Science at John Jay College, a campus of the City University of New York (CUNY).

Curriculum Vitae

Bing Xu

Institute of Sociology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

Bing Xu is Associate Professor in the Institute of Sociology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (2006-) and Visiting Fellow of the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University (August 1, 2009 – July 31, 2010). He received his B. A. of Psychology (1989) from Beijing Normal University, M. A. of Social Psychology (1996) and Ph.D. of Sociology (2003) from Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He has been on the editorial board of the Chinese journals Social Theory and Chinese Social Psychological Review.

He is interested in cultural psychology and cultural sociology, which overlap each other from the hermeneutical approach he advocates. He has authored more than twenty papers in top Chinese journals in the fields of sociology, social psychology and social theory on the theoretical subjects of the self-aware Chinese psychology and sociology, the hermeneutical approach in social sciences, the Chinese traditional concept of the self, the qingli (the emotional reason) in Chinese traditional social context and the empirical subjects of the values of contemporary Chinese college students, the needs of the Chinese internet users, the inner motive and social pattern of contemporary Chinese people’s lying, etc.. His collection The Hermeneutical Approach between Psychology and Sociology has been sent into the process of the application and examination of the Press of Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He recently edited and wrote a long introduction for the fifth volume of Chinese Social Psychological Review, which focuses on cultural psychology and will be published within 2010. He is currently working on framework for his empirical study—A “deep description” of the identity crisis of the contemporary Chinese.

Eviatar Zerubavel 

Rutgers University

Professor Zerubavel’s main areas of interest are cognitive sociology and the sociology of time. His publications include Patterns of Time in Hospital Life: A Sociological Perspective (University of Chicago Press, 1979); Hidden Rhythms: Schedules and Calendars in Social Life (University of Chicago Press, 1981. Paperback, University of California Press, 1985. (Japanese, 1984. Italian, 1985); The Seven-Day Circle: The History and Meaning of the Week (Free Press, 1985. Paperback, University of Chicago Press, 1989. Korean, forthcoming. Listed among Choice’s Outstanding Academic Books, 1985); The Fine Line: Making Distinctions in Everyday Life (Free Press, 1991. Paperback, University of Chicago Press, 1993); Terra Cognita: The Mental Discovery of America (Rutgers University Press, 1992. Transaction, 2003); Social Mindscapes: An Invitation to Cognitive Sociology (Harvard University Press, 1997. Paperback, 1999. Norwegian, 2000); The Clockwork Muse: A Practical Guide to Writing Theses, Dissertations, and Books (Harvard University Press, 1999); Time Maps: Collective Memory and the Social Shape of the Past (University of Chicago Press, 2003. Paperback, 2004. Italian, 2005); and The Elephant in the Room: Silence and Denial in Everyday Life (Oxford University Press, in press). Professor Zerubavel served from 1992 to 2001 as the director of the Rutgers sociology graduate program. In 2000–01 he served as Chair of the Culture Section of the American Sociological Association. In 2003 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship. He teaches graduate courses in cognitive sociology, time and memory, and sociological theory.